Emory University

W. Robert Taylor


 

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Dr. Taylor’s laboratory is focused on obtaining a better understanding of the role of vascular inflammation in the pathogenesis of vascular disease. His work employs novel animal models of human vascular disease to study the role of various mechanical and humoral factors in the development of hypertension and atherosclerosis. He has a particular interest in the renin angiotensin system, advanced glycation endproducts, biomechanical forces and oxidative stress. A significant effort is also underway to examine the interaction between vascular inflammation and bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells. Dr. Taylor’s research program involves strong collaborative efforts with other members of the Department of Biomedical Engineering with a focus on applying enabling nanotechnology and imaging approaches to the general area of atherosclerosis.

David Lynn


 

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The David G. Lynn Group at Emory University works to understand the structures and forces that enable supramolecular self-assembly, how chemical information can be stored and translated into new molecular entities, and how the forces of evolution can be harnessed in new structures with new function. Some of our current research areas include the origins of prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogenesis, template directed polymerization and dynamic combinatorial systems, amyloid diseases and protein self-assembly, and intelligent materials.

Chunhui Xu


 

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The Xu laboratory is focusing on human cardiomyocytes derived from pluripotent stem cells, which hold promise for cardiac cell therapy, disease modeling, drug discovery, and the study of developmental biology. The laboratory is also collaborating with investigators in Georgia Tech, Emory University, and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, exploring the application of nanotechnology and tissue engineering in stem cell research.

Muralidhar Padala


 

Biography:

An engineer by training, Dr. Padala is currently focused on studying the biomechanics and mechanobiology of heart valve disease and heart failure. He received his BS in mechanical engineering from Osmania University in India in 2004, and an MS in mechanical engineering and PhD in bioengineering from Georgia Tech in 2010. Since joining Emory and establishing his independent laboratory in 2010, his focus has been on studying in-vivo heart valve and cardiac mechanics in pre-clinical models. In 2012, he spent one year at Imperial College London on a Leducq Fondation Career Development Award. He trained under Prof. Sir. Magdi Yacoub, a pioneer in cardiac transplantation and heart valve tissue engineering.

Research Keywords:

Heart failure, cardiac valve disease, cardiovascular devices, cell and gene therapy, tissue engineering of heart valves

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My laboratory is interested in the pathogenesis of heart valve disease and its impact on the onset and progression of heart failure. We use rodent and swine models of heart valve regurgitation, to understand the changes in the myocardial remodeling at multiple scales. Our recent work is also focused on linking functional changes in the myocardium to detectable genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic changes, and investigate the potential of using their relationship for early detection of heart failure. Some of our work also involves developing new medical devices and technologies to repair heart valves and associated heart failure.

Nael McCarty


 

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Molecular physiology of ion channels and receptors, with emphasis on epithelial chloride channels. Our specific focus is the pathophysiology of Cystic Fibrosis, including the structure/function of CFTR and its many roles in the airway.

Young-sup Yoon


 

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The Yoon Lab has been working on stem cell research in various cardiovascular diseases. Our major research interest is to use stem cell technology to treat various cardiovascular diseases, and we have been developing and using different bone marrow-derived stem sell or progenitor cells for cardiovascular repair.

Nicholas Boulis


 

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Dr. Nicholas Boulis, MD is a Functional Neurosurgeon with significant expertise in the field of gene transfer to the nervous system. Dr. Boulis' Gene and Cell Therapy Translational Laboratory pursues advanced biological treatments for neurological disorders, including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) and Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA).

Nick Willett


 

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The overall research of the lab focuses on a systems integration approach to musculoskeletal disease and regenerative engineering by applying novel imaging and engineering approaches to mechanistic biology problems. Our current work has three main thrusts: (i) cell and biologic therapies for the healing of large bone and muscle defects, (ii) multi-scale mechanical regulation of bone regeneration, (iii) intra-articular therapeutic delivery for post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Combining backgrounds in mechanical engineering, vascular biology and musculoskeletal tissue regeneration, our research integrates mechanics principles and analytical tools with molecular biology techniques to uniquely address challenges of musculoskeletal disease and regeneration.

John Oshinski


 

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Dr. Oshinski is well known for his collaborative efforts between Emory and Georgia Tech's Department of Biomedical Engineering, along with his dedication to advancing the technologies of MR imaging. One area of concentration is the development of Cardiovascular MRI for clinical and basic science applications. Dr. Oshinski has worked on development of the contrast-enhanced MRA and phase-contrast MR for rapid assessment of the aorta and the peripheral runoff vessels. He also Implemented SSFP cine imaging for rapid breath-hold assessment of cardiac function, IR recovery sequences for myocardial perfusion imaging, and creating a protocol for using MR coronary angiography to diagnose the proximal course of the coronary arteries.

Steven Goudy


 

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Cleft and craniofacial disorders are my primary clinical and basic research interests. Even though the surgical repair of cleft lip and palate is highly effective, patients will continue to be faced with ongoing medical, dental, and surgical care. Surgical outcomes can be variable, and the patient's facial growth and development is primarily the result of their genetic composition. Therefore, much of my research focuses on the problems that can develop during the years that follow surgery. 

Underdevelopment of the upper jaw is one of the main sequelae of cleft palate repair and causes maxillary hypoplasia. To uncover why this happens, I have assembled a team of collaborators that includes Drs. Nick Willett (Emory Department of Orthopedics), Gregory Gibson (Center for Integrative Genomics, Georgia Institute of Technology), and Michael Davis (Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University), all of whom are experts in the fields of bone and vascular biology. Our goal is to determine how cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous Jagged1 signaling during maxillary development contributes to final maxillary formation. 

With assistance from Drs. Scott Boden (Emory Department of Orthopedics), Roberto Pacifici (Emory Department of Medicine), and Bob Taylor (Emory Department of Medicine), I am examining how intramembranous ossification of the maxillary and palatine bones contributes to later maxillary morphology. Dr. Greg Gibson (Director of the Center for Integrative Genomics, Georgia Tech) will help plan, execute, and analyze the RNA-seq data to identify the targets of Jagged1 signaling. We have already published our observations involving the bony phenotype and our conclusion that Wnt1-Cre;Jagged1 F/F mice are a viable model of post-natal maxillary hypoplasia. Once we have a wider understanding of maxillary development, we plan on developing targeted therapies for future in vitro and in vivo correction of maxillary hypoplasia in the Jag1CKO mice

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