Emory University

Adam M. Klein


 

Biography:

Adam M. Klein, MD, FACS joined the Emory Voice Center in the Emory Department of Otolaryngology in 2005 after completing a fellowship in Laryngology and Care of the Professional Voice at the Harvard University for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Restoration.  His research interests include vocal fold reanimation, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, neurologic disorders of the voice and surgical simulation.  He has been issued US patents for Apparatuses and Methods for Simulating Microlaryngeal Surgery and Surgical Arm Support for Phonomicrosurgery, with others pending. 

As an innovator of new surgical and simulation devices, Dr. Klein has worked to build a culture of collaboration between his department and the Georgia Institute of Technology.  He serves as a faculty mentor for the Masters in Biomedical Innovation and Development program, as well as numerous senior design projects.  He created and directs the Emory Innovation Group in Otolaryngology and lectures nationally and internationally on new innovations and treatments in the management of voice disorders.

 

Research Interests:

Medical and Surgical Device Design, Development and Delivery

Christopher C. Porter, MD


 

Research Keywords:

childhood cancer, leukemia, cancer predisposition, cancer immunology

Research Areas:

Research Interests:

The goal of the Porter lab is to develop novel therapeutic strategies for leukemia through better understanding of molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis and treatment resistance. We employ a wide variety of techniques, in vitro and in vivo, for discovery and validation of molecular vulnerabilities in cancer cells. For example, using a genome-scale shRNA screen, we identified WEE1 as a chemosensitizing target in AML cells. Subsequent studies funded by the NCI have validated this finding and supported the development of a clinical trial testing a WEE1 inhibitor in children with relapsed/refractory AML. More recently, we have discovered a novel function for the transcription factor ETV6 in regulating normal B cell development, and will test whether and how Etv6 mutation promotes leukemogenesis using a new mouse model with a point mutation in Etv6. A third project in the lab is directed at understanding mechanisms of immune evasion during leukemogenesis.

Candace Fleischer


 

Research Keywords:

magnetic resonance spectroscopy, brain injury, cancer

Hyojung Choo


 

Research Keywords:

Cell Biology, Emory School of Medicine

Research Interests:

Craniofacial muscles are essential muscles for normal daily life. They are involved in facial expressions (facial muscles), blinking and eye movement (eye muscles), as well as speaking and eating (tongue and pharyngeal muscles).

Interestingly, craniofacial muscles have differential susceptibility to several muscular dystrophies. For example, craniofacial muscles are the most affected muscles in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy but the least affected muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Among craniofacial muscles, dysfunction of tongue and pharyngeal muscles could cause an eating disability, called dysphagia, afflicts almost 15 million Americans including elderly, neuronal (Parkinson’s disease and bulbar-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and muscular disease (oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy) patients. However, no cure or therapeutic treatment exists for dysphagia caused by muscular dystrophy. Elucidation of the mechanism(s) behind these differing susceptibilities of craniofacial muscles could lead to development of potential therapeutics targeted to specific skeletal muscles involved in particular types of muscular dystrophy.


The mechanisms of skeletal muscles are of interest here because skeletal muscle cells are multinucleated cells. Typically, skeletal muscle cells contain hundreds of nuclei in a single cell since they are generated by fusion of muscle precursor cells during development or by fusion of muscle specific stem cells, called satellite cells, in adult skeletal muscles. However, it is unclear how skeletal muscle cells regulate the quantity and quality of these multi-nuclei. Since craniofacial skeletal muscles, such as extraocular and pharyngeal muscles, have active satellite cell fusion in comparison to limb muscles, they are therefore suitable models to study myonuclear addition and homeostasis.

Elliot Chaikof


 

Research Affiliations:

Research Areas:

Rebecca Levit


 

Research Affiliations:

Research Areas:

Research Interests:

Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. We are dedicated to developing new therapies to help cardiac patients by identifying, testing, and moving new therapies towards clinical use. We study stem cell therapies to prevent heart damage and promote repair. We use biomaterials to increase cell retention, increase efficacy, and target activity.

Brent Keeling


 

Research Interests:

Targeted clinical investigations of adult cardiac surgical sub-populations.

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